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Hobbies of Philosophers: Lauren Ashwell

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Hobbies of Philosophers: Lauren Ashwell

Lauren Ashwell is assistant professor of philosophy at Bates College. She works in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and feminist ethics, and her work has been published in Philosophical StudiesPhilosophy CompassAustralasian Journal of Philosophy and elsewhere. So she’s good at her day job. But that is just a necessary, not sufficient, reason for being featured i..

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Philosophy Tag

In our previous round, Anthony Shiver (University of Georgia) tagged A.J. Cotnoir (University of St. Andrews). The game continues, as Cotnoir makes his move… What is the logic of negation? And how could disagreements over this question ever be genuine, and not — as Quine thought — amount to merely changing the subject? In his ‘A Modality Called Ne..
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Philosophy Tag

Hey, remember Philosophy Tag? Someone got called home for dinner or something in the middle of the last game and that was that for a while, but now it is back, courtesy of Sara Bernstein (Duke). Let’s see who she has tagged…

Consider the following case, Battlefield: You are at the battlefield and see that some of your soldiers are about to be slaughtered by..

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Philosophy Tag

Gillian Russell (Washington University in St. Louis) was tagged last week by Franz Berto (Amsterdam) in the logic playground, where the game has been playing for a while now. Let’s see where Russell’s tag takes us.

There’s a pervasive thought in many cultures and religions—one that I’ve found attractive in the past—that moral anxiety in human agents is a ..

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Philosophy Tag

Last week, Sara Bernstein (Duke) made Roberta Ballarin (University of British Columbia) it. Who’s Ballarin going to tag? Let’s find out…

Atomicity is the thesis that everything is ultimately composed of atoms, entities that lack proper parts. Atomicity is standardly defined as “for every x there is a y such that y is an atom and y is a part of x”, i.e. ever..

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