Mini-Heap


The latest links…

  1. “Going There, the gossipy tell-all from news anchor Katie Couric, has very little in common with a volume that bears the name Lectures on the Philosophy of Mathematics. Look closer, though, and a few themes emerge” — the latest from Joel David Hamkins (Oxford) is on Bloomberg’s “best books” list, aimed at “the executive class”
  2. “Again and again Rorty reveals a perspective on current work to which I had been oblivious, including on topics I thought I had mastered” — Daniel Dennett on Rorty’s “On Philosophy and Philosophers”
  3. “Since things we can easily imagine are especially pleasing to us, men prefer order to confusion, as if order were anything in nature more than a relation to our imagination” — Baruch de Spinoza interviewed at 3:16AM
  4. On “the conflict between holding fast to our beliefs about what we think is just and appropriate for society, and giving our political opponents the respect they deserve even if we disagree with their beliefs about justice” — Robert Talisse (Vanderbilt) in conversation with Lilly J. Goren (Carroll)
  5. “Why does this guy David Chalmers keep following me around? Every time I look in the mirror, he’s there. That’s kind of freaky” — NYT interview with Dave Chalmers (NYU) on the nature of reality, meaningful lives, consciousness, and The Matrix
  6. “If the university has grown inhospitable to the humanities, perhaps scholars can smuggle them out, book by book, one affordable seminar at a time” — philosophers and others venture beyond the ivory tower to help people develop and pursue their love of learning (via Scott Newstok)
  7. What we can—and can’t—learn from increasingly detailed maps of the neural connections in brains — using connectomes to predict behavior, and other developments in connectomics

Mini-Heap posts usually appear when 7 or so new items accumulate in the Heap of Links, a collection of items from around the web that may be of interest to philosophers. Discussion welcome.

The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap. Thanks!

 

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