Irony of the Day: Special Issues and Political Correctness Edition


Jean-Yves Beziau (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), recently in the news for bizarre remarks he made about political correctness, homosexuality, and the attractiveness of an “old lady” in an essay on logical pluralism in a special issues of Synthese (which prompted a moratorium on special issues there, and reconsideration of policies of editorial oversight and peer review in special issues elsewhere), will be the guest editor of a special issue of Philosophies. The topic? Political correctness.

You can read about the special issue here.

On a hunch, I checked out the editorial policies of Philosophies. Of course, no double-blind review:

Once a manuscript passes the initial checks, it will be assigned to at least two independent experts for peer-review. A single-blind review is applied, where authors’ identities are known to reviewers. Peer review comments are confidential and will only be disclosed with the express agreement of the reviewer… In the case of a special issue, the Guest Editor will advise in the selection of reviewers. Potential reviewers suggested by the authors may also be considered.

I couldn’t find any information about how Philosophies selects guest editors for its special issues. Maybe it is too politically correct to wonder whether a special issue on political correctness should be edited by someone whose research is in or relevant to political correctness, but I am curious how Beziau, whose work is mainly in logic, got the gig. It probably had nothing to do with the fact that he is on the editorial board of the journal.

head slap socrates copy

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Diogenes of Sinope
5 years ago

You don’t think he could’ve got the gig because of his relevant experience of being witch-hunted by an online mob of PC enforcers who have made whole careers out of imagining sexism where none is present?Report

profman
profman
Reply to  Diogenes of Sinope
5 years ago

No.Report

Doug O.
Doug O.
Reply to  profman
5 years ago

Count professors as among the PC enforcers. Probably the same answer given when someone asks about the plausibility of any alternative or unpopular view.Report

MA Student
MA Student
Reply to  Diogenes of Sinope
5 years ago

Yeah. No.Report

Kathryn Pogin
Kathryn Pogin
Reply to  Diogenes of Sinope
5 years ago

Oh, come now Diogenes, surely you know the appropriate language would be “witch and/or warlock-hunted.”Report

JT
JT
Reply to  Diogenes of Sinope
5 years ago

Is the idea that because (let’s suppose) he had been a victim of ‘PC enforcers’ he is now a *philosophical expert* on the phenomenon of ‘political correctness’ (whatever that is) simply in virtue of his experience as a victim? So, I guess, by parity of reasoning, anyone who’s been a victim of bullying more generally would be a *philosophical expert* on bullies? You’re funny.Report

Arthur Greeves
Arthur Greeves
5 years ago

It seemed to me that Diogenes’s comment was false, and that Beziau’s position on the editorial board obviously was central here. But that just makes me more befuddled as to why Diogenes’s comment appears to be deleted.Report

Arthur Greeves
Arthur Greeves
Reply to  Arthur Greeves
5 years ago

Retracted, because the comment has magically appeared again.Report

Diogenes of Sinope
Reply to  Justin Weinberg
5 years ago

Justin, you’ve never heard of a figure of speech called hyperbole then?

hyperbole
hʌɪˈpəːbəli
noun
exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally.
“he vowed revenge with oaths and hyperboles”
synonyms: exaggeration, overstatement, magnification, amplification, embroidery, embellishment, overplaying, excess, overkill;Report

Arthur Greeves
Arthur Greeves
Reply to  Justin Weinberg
5 years ago

Thanks for the explanation, Justin. I respect your opinion, and I think your decision was fair. One thing:

You seem to say that certain serious philosophers should be worried that they will be given a bad name because of other people, with genuinely different views, say silly things. I have no idea why they should be worried, unless there are people making bald and vicious generalizations about groups of people with who only have one small characteristic in common. And if there are such people — and if they do things to silence or intimidate dissenting speech — those people seem like a bigger problem than Beziau or Diogenes.

Generally, philosophers are pretty fearless about voicing their opinions unless there is a thought police.Report

Kathryn Pogin
Kathryn Pogin
5 years ago

In all seriousness, given that this is a philosophy of science journal, and given that there’s a rich existing literature on the role of values in theory construction — particularly scientific theory — and the influence of politics in philosophy (How the Cold War Transformed Philosophy of Science is one of my favorite reads) I was a little surprised the call for papers didn’t seem as if this issue will be building on those existing bodies of work.Report