Mini-Heap


Here’s the latest Mini-Heap—10 recent items from the Heap of Links, the frequently updated list of links to stuff around the web philosophers might want to check out.

The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap.

Discussion welcome.

  1. If Bart Streumer (Groningen) is right, there’s no reason to listen to him talk about his book at this link — on the plus side, there’s no reason *not* to, either
  2. Why should gender be the state’s business? — Robin Dembroff (Yale) in the NYRB
  3. “Philosophy of science… can help us be better scientists” — say two scientists, writing in The Guardian
  4. Why moral philosophers should be reading anthropology — are you aware of the field’s “ethical turn”?
  5. What is political theory? — a working definition and five tasks for it, at Digressions & Impressions
  6. “Free will can be injured just like other human abilities” — Micah Johnson on criminal behavior, brain injuries, and free will
  7. “They are the mechanical realizations of much larger sets of institutional intentions, involving the plans of designers and the decisions of people” — Michael Robillard (Oxford) on moral responsibility and killer robots
  8. “Apologists for empire are [not] simply living in the past. They seek, rather, to rewrite the past as a way of shaping current debates. That makes it even more important that their ideas and arguments are challenged openly” — Kenan Malik on the “Case for Colonialism” controversy
  9. There’s no crisis in the humanities — rather, “the democratisation of higher education has broadened the portfolio of courses, to a decline in the share of degrees awarded in… humanities and…sciences. By any measure, the humanities have weathered the transition better.”
  10. Philosophy, public debate, and respectful engagement — a discussion with John Corvino (Wayne State) and Robert Talisse (Vanderbilt)

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