Public School Curriculum Denies Moral Facts


Our public schools teach students that all claims are either facts or opinions and that all value and moral claims fall into the latter camp. The punchline: there are no moral facts. And if there are no moral facts, then there are no moral truths.

The inconsistency in this curriculum is obvious. For example, at the outset of the school year, my son brought home a list of student rights and responsibilities. Had he already read the lesson on fact vs. opinion, he might have noted that the supposed rights of other students were based on no more than opinions. According to the school’s curriculum, it certainly wasn’t true that his classmates deserved to be treated a particular way — that would make it a fact. Similarly, it wasn’t really true that he had any responsibilities — that would be to make a value claim a truth. It should not be a surprise that there is rampant cheating on college campuses: If we’ve taught our students for 12 years that there is no fact of the matter as to whether cheating is wrong, we can’t very well blame them for doing so later on.

That’s Justin McBrayer (Fort Lewis College), in today’s “The Stone” in The New York Times. The piece is interesting, not just for laying out those elements of typical and Common Core curricula that apparently lead to a significant inconsistency and later problems with student behavior, but as an example of the potential value of bringing philosophical reasoning into public policy decisions.

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