Minor Vandalism on PhilPapers


A philosophy professor recently noticed that the title of one of his articles in its listing at PhilPapers had been changed.

In place of its original title was a message that began with “Please eliminate your account”:

The professor noticed that this had happened to another philosopher’s listing as well.

A quick search showed about a dozen entries whose titles had been altered in this way. For perspective, note that PhilPapers has over 2.8 million entries.

I got in touch with PhilPapers and they undid the vandalism immediately and locked the user account through which the title changes had been made. David Bourget, one of the co-founders of PhilPapers, said, “It’s the first time we have this problem in 15 years, but we always expected it and prepared for it.”

If you’re curious, you can check out the PhilPapers Code of Conduct.

Suggestions for what “donounce” should mean are welcome.

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Monte Johnson
1 month ago

Let me take this opportunity to say how grateful I am for Philpapers and Philpeople (etc.), and how proud I am that we have this non-commercial facility built by philosophers and for philosophers and given to us for free. I am frequently encouraging people to move their papers and profiles off of “Academia.edu” which requires registration to access papers, contains advertisements, constantly sends spam messages, etc. Thanks to David and David and the others that have made such a superior option available for the philosophical community. I really appreciate it!

Chris Letheby
Chris Letheby
Reply to  Monte Johnson
1 month ago

Well said. I quit Academia.edu a while back and use Phil* exclusively now.

SCM
SCM
1 month ago

I think “donounce” is actually a misspelling of the word properly used to describe drawing attention to someone’s Homer Simpson-level foolishness, viz., “d’oh!-nounce.”

Trevor Hedberg
1 month ago

Last week, I observed that someone had inserted a sentence that said “my underlying theory is that I am the master and sick my c***” in the abstract of a paper I wanted to read. (The “sick” is not a typo — that’s actually what it said.) As of now, that abstract has been corrected, but I suspect the perpetrator of this might have also been behind this other act of virtual vandalism.

George Crowe
1 month ago

“donounce” is a portmanteau word from ” don ounce ” meaning- put on a little weight, possibly not enough to consider weight loss medication. A thin definition, not a thick one.

Phil grad
Phil grad
1 month ago

Donounce: To speak with one’s mouth full of delicious donuts.
“Sorry you’re having trouble understanding me. Just went to Dunkin, so I’ll be donouncing for a while.”

Michael Shepanski
Michael Shepanski
1 month ago

The average donut weighs slightly more than an ounce, so “donounce” is to “ounce” as “baker’s dozen” is to “dozen”.

jeff
jeff
1 month ago

“Donounce” is announcing a donation and forgetting to send it, pronounced “doh’ nah oon ss”.

MPA
MPA
1 month ago

“donounce” is a noun formed from “Don” and “ounce” and refers to the pound of flesh, as it were, that a mafia Don extracts from their enemies or disobedient subordinates.

Example: “I shouldn’t have cheated Tony,” said Paulie. “He really took the donounce this time.”