Stanley Accepts Visiting Position in Ukraine; Will Donate Entire Salary


Jason Stanley, professor of philosophy at Yale University, has accepted a permanent visiting position at the Kyiv School of Economics in Ukraine.

Beginning in the summer of 2024, he will be in residence in Kyiv for several weeks teaching an intensive course. He says he plans to “continue this appointment even after the Ukrainian Defense Forces decisively defeat the Russian army.”

He will retain his primary appointment at Yale.

Stanley says that his entire salary from the position at Kyiv School of Economics will be donated, in perpetuity, to the organization Come Back Alive, The charitable foundation says its mission is “to enhance the effectiveness of the Ukrainian Defense Forces, save the lives of our servicemen, and systematically counteract the enemy. To achieve this, the Foundation procures equipment, including thermal optics, drones, vehicles, and surveillance and reconnaissance systems.”

In an announcement about the new position, Stanley, who taught at class at the Kyiv School of Economics this past summer, writes:

It was an honor to spend this time alongside the Ukrainian people, who are fighting the army of a bloodthirsty fascist dictator. As a leftist and anti-fascist, I believe this is the center of the fight against global fascism today… Vladimir Putin loves a bloodbath. The Ukrainian Defense Forces is fighting against the 21st century’s version of Hitler so that the world may one day be safe from the depredations of his regime. 

He is hoping to encourage others to donate to Come Back Alive.

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Sophia
Sophia
5 months ago

This is really fantastic news. I am an American philosophy PhD student with ties to Ukraine, and I had the privilege of attending Jason’s lectures in Kyiv this past summer. Jason lectured on fascism and colonialism, and we read literature on a number of classic theories alongside contemporary Ukrainian authors discussing philosophical and political implications of the current war. It was really invigorating to be in an academic setting where we could apply philosophical concepts to issues of pressing contemporary importance, the relevance of which was underscored by the air raid sirens that punctuated the lectures, sometimes forcing us to move the discussion to a bomb shelter.

Attending these lectures really helped me to organize my own thoughts around the war. More broadly, this kind of engagement benefits Ukrainians because it takes them seriously as thinkers and moral and political agents, promotes cross-cultural dialogue, and represents a real ongoing commitment to a Ukrainian victory. Jason obviously understands how important Ukraine’s success in this war is to a wider global struggle against fascism, and I am really happy to see that there are philosophers who are willing to make practical commitments that reflect their political and moral values. I really wish more philosophers would take on projects like this.

Henry Lara-Steidel
Henry Lara-Steidel
5 months ago

I am wondering if there is a chance for American students to attend? (US Army veteran; war is not new to me.)

Sophia
Sophia
Reply to  Henry Lara-Steidel
5 months ago

This past summer the lectures were open to the public (and also streamed online), but I’m not sure what the structure will be in the future.

Henry Lara-Steidel
Henry Lara-Steidel
Reply to  Sophia
5 months ago

I’ll keep an eye out. Can you let me know if you hear something? Maybe I’ll reach out to Stanley too.