Mini-Heap


The latest links in the Heap…

  1. “I did not need Chinese Philosophy to understand analytic philosophy, and vice versa… There are some deep structural differences between their fundamental conceptual frameworks” — an interview with Hiu Chuk Winnie Sung (Nanyang), who has two PhDs (one in Chinese philosophy, one in analytic philosohy)
  2. “If a lion could speak, we could not understand him.” What about a whale? — researchers aim to use machine learning, language models, and other technology to figure out what whales are saying
  3. “Though their relationship was not primarily sexual, they were in love in the sense of having a deep desire to know and be known” — Sukaina Hirji (Penn) and Meena Krishnamurthy (Queen’s) on the idea of “romantic friendship” and the example of it between Iris Murdoch and Philippa Foot
  4. “A combinatorial system is one in which a relatively small number of simple things are combined to form a relatively large number of more complex things… Could morality be such a system?” — yes, say an interdisciplinary team of researchers who explain “moral molecules” and provide a “periodic table of ethics”
  5. Break each article into segments of up to five words long, then publish each of those segments as a separate file in a publicly accessible index — how technologist Carl Malamud is freeing the world’s paywalled research for data analysis. His index contains material from over 100 million journal articles. Is it legal?
  6. What’s good and what’s bad about being a child, and why — Anca Gheaus provides a conceptual map to two views about childhood
  7. “Epistemology is a normative enterprise, ethics is a normative enterprise” — and the two areas should be “consistently informed by an appreciation of each other’s problems,” says Mark Schroeder (USC)

Mini-Heap posts usually appear when 7 or so new items accumulate in the Heap of Links, a collection of items from around the web that may be of interest to philosophers. Discussion welcome.

The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap. Thanks!

 

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