Mini-Heap


New additions to the Heap of Links…

  1. “In recent months, and for the first time, I’ve been embarrassed to be a philosopher… Philosophy has a problem and that problem is hubris” — says Stephen Mumford (Durham). Can you guess what prompted this?
  2. Nicolas Cage as various philosophers — from Hane Maung (Manchester)
  3. “The philosopher has to be the bad conscience of his age” — Richard Marshall interviews Friedrich Nietzsche at 3:16AM
  4. “Collaborations with scientists can suffer when the cultural differences between disciplines are not acknowledged and tended” — Michael Paul Nelson (Oregon State) has some advice for scientists and philosophers working with each other
  5. Demographic data about people with philosophy PhDs — results from the recent Academic Placement and Data Analysis project
  6. “Let white students simply think that a Black professor is discriminating against them based upon race and see how quickly the white students are believed” — some black people may have racial prejudices and individual power, but, says George Yancy (Emory), that is different from systemic racism
  7. “That comedy is an important social safety valve and sometimes an epistemically useful window in a democracy also entails that it may be socially dangerous” — Eric Schliesser (Amsterdam) on Chappelle, Srinivasan, Letterman, Trump, Aristophanes, and Socrates

Mini-Heap posts usually appear when 7 or so new items accumulate in the Heap of Links, a collection of items from around the web that may be of interest to philosophers. Discussion welcome.

The Heap of Links consists partly of suggestions from readers; if you find something online that you think would be of interest to the philosophical community, please send it in for consideration for the Heap. Thanks!

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Nate Sheff
1 month ago

Ahem… *Nicolas* Cage.Report

JDRox
29 days ago

Sorry, can’t get past the first two sentences of the Yancy article. It begins, “To attack critical race theory is to attack Black knowledge production and attempt to silence its epistemological disruptive reverberations, which challenge the U.S.’s atrocious anti-Black racism. The attacks waged against everything deemed “critical race theory” constitute a new form of McCarthyism, deeming all ideas legitimately critical of realities in the U.S. as “un-American.”” Both sentences are false. Attacking critical race theory isn’t attacking Black knowledge production in any meaningful sense. (It attacks it in the non-meaningful because utterly benign sense that critical race theory was produced by Black people–but there’s obviously nothing wrong, per se, with attacking something that was produced by a Black person!) And many of the people attacking critical race theory also think they have legitimate criticisms of the reality of abortion in the U.S., and don’t think that such criticism is un-American. I’m not saying there aren’t good points later in the article, maybe there are, but I feel like when someone is saying false things in public someone should speak up. Please do let me know if I’m the one who’s saying false things though.Report