Philosophy Journals: A Crowdsourced Guide for Authors


Philosophers, are you tired of googling and clicking and scrolling to find out which journal is the right one for the manuscript you just finished?

If so, a new spreadsheet of philosophy journal information may be just the thing for you. Initiated by Gabriele Contessa (Carleton), the spreadsheet is an in-progress crowdsourced document sharing journal word-limits, editorial policies, links to author guidelines, and other information.

At the moment it only has 40 or so journals listed, but with your help, it could become a more comprehensive resource.

Check it out:

The document is also viewable and editable here.

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Caleb Cohoe
2 years ago

For those working in ancient philosophy and history of philosophy, I’ve compiled a similar list for all the ancient philosophy and history of philosophy journals I’m aware of that also includes response times and editorial experience from the APA Journals survey, when available: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1U8UzDF2uETJ8mK8ZZJkcsI88Aow_OAbR_kwOLtF3368/edit?usp=sharing
I’ll work on adding those journals to Gabriele’s spreadsheet.Report

driftincowboy
driftincowboy
2 years ago

It would be pretty easy to put this data in a database and serve it up in an HTML document. Gimme a thumbs up if you’re interested in thatReport

Derek Shiller
Derek Shiller
Reply to  driftincowboy
2 years ago

To ensure that it stays up to date, you can also grab a JSON version directly from google: https://spreadsheets.google.com/feeds/cells/1zkgDH25GkItRpXE65XSsce0S2Mf4wzp_XxJE4r8az0g/1/public/full?alt=jsonReport

Stephen Hetherington
Stephen Hetherington
2 years ago

AJP is listed as having a ‘Word limit’ of 8000. But that isn’t quite right. 8k is our norm max; 15k is our absolute max. A paper longer than 8k needs to be better, all else being equal, than a paper of 8k. As a paper stretches even further beyond that norm max, it needs to be even better, all else still being equal. A paper longer than 8k can therefore be allowed an R&R, but I (as Editor) might also require the revised version to be shortened. (I don’t do this simply to satisfy the ‘norm max’ as such. I try to envisage how the paper might be shortened, and hence what the resulting paper would be like, as writing and as philosophy.)Report

Joona Räsänen
Joona Räsänen
2 years ago

I have been working on a similar project. My files include journal rankings (Leiter ranking and Finnish and Norwegian journal rankings) and publisher ’s copyright & self-archiving policies (RoMEO classification).

The file also includes bioethics/medical ethics journals.

The file can be viewed and downloaded here. https://www.academia.edu/40348800/Where_to_publish_in_Philosophy_Ethics_and_BioethicsReport

James Collier
2 years ago

For philosophers, especially early-career philosophers, interested in a uniquely developmental and dialogical approach to open access publishing (no word limits, no fees, you retain copyright), please contact us at the Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective (https://social-epistemology.com/about/). We publish a range of philosophical and scholarly approaches and voices (https://social-epistemology.com/bibliography/).Report

Ben Davies
Ben Davies
2 years ago

Maybe it’s only me who can’t see this (in which case, apologies), but it would be useful to have a header at the top of each column to say what it refers to. For instance, I’m guessing the red/green column with mostly ‘Yes’ or ‘No is about open access, but I’m not sure. Similarly, I assume that column C is about word limit, but then I’m not entirely clear what column D is.Report

dan
dan
Reply to  Ben Davies
2 years ago

the headings are, oddily, at the bottom of each columns and not at the top.Report

Ben Davies
Ben Davies
Reply to  dan
2 years ago

So they are. Thanks!Report