New: the Journal of Modern Philosophy


A new online, open access, peer-reviewed journal focusing on philosophy from the 16th century through mid-18th century has been created. Called the Journal of Modern Philosophy, its co-editors are Aaron Garrett (Boston University) and Antonia LoLordo (University of Virginia).

The editors and the editorial board of the journal write:

The Journal of Modern Philosophy is now soliciting submissions in the history of philosophy from the 16th century to the 18th century up to, but not including, Kant. It is the goal of this journal to meet a clear need for a specialist journal in the history of modern philosophy. We welcome all papers that fall within the general category of modern philosophy, but we are especially eager to receive papers on under-represented figures and topics.

We plan to expand to Kant and the nineteenth century in the future, and will at present consider submissions on underrepresented topics and authors in the nineteenth century.

We also welcome reviewers who wish to be enrolled with the journal. 

JMPhil is Open Access, authors will maintain their copyright, and submissions will be published on a rolling basis. All submissions will be double anonymously refereed, with a target turnaround time of ten weeks.

The journal is sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Department of Philosophy at Boston University, and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Virginia.

You can learn more about the journal here.

Maria Sibylla Merian, “Lizard” (1719)

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Nick
Nick
2 years ago

Are we to understand that the journal scope is restricted to Europe—I.e., Journal of Modern [European] Philosophy?Report

Antonia LoLordo
Antonia LoLordo
2 years ago

Nick, this is something we talked about a lot. Given the state of the field we expect that the vast majority of submissions will be about European philosophy. However, the journal is definitely NOT limited to European philosophy. If you have a paper about eg 17th century Indian philosophy you’d like to send us please do!Report

Matt
Reply to  Antonia LoLordo
2 years ago

I am curious about this. Obviously, the editors can make whatever choices they want, and there’s nothing inherently wrong with this. Including more areas of philosophy will often be good. But, does it fit with the stated focus of the journal? I would have thought that the reasons for having the journal focus on 16th-18th C (European) philosophy is that the people at that time are responding to a particular background- both the philosophy before them, and the on-going scientific and political situation in Europe, are often in correspondence with and responding to each other, and so on. This justifies treating these periods as a group, at least for many purposes. Is that true if we extend the focus to, say, India or China? I’d guess that it is, at least, much less so. If we make this extension, why limit it to the time period? That time period in Europe is also the focus of the editors, which is some justification for the limit, but if we’re going to go beyond the focus of the editors, why do that in space, but not in time?

Again, I don’t oppose this. The journal sounds great, and the editors should do what they want, and I personally think it’s great to have lots of different kinds of journals with different focuses, but I’d be very interested to hear more about why the extension in space was decided for, but the extension in time quite limited. (Like Nick, the question is inquisitive, not critical – I’m interested in how and why such decisions are made.)Report

Nick
Nick
2 years ago

Thanks for the very reasonable reply, Antonia. (The question was inquisitive rather than critical, and I hope it was received in that way.)Report

driftinCowboy
driftinCowboy
2 years ago

Is this journal non-profit?Report