APA / BPA Journal Surveys


Last year, the American Philosophical Association (APA) and the British Philosophical Association (BPA) teamed up to conduct a survey of philosophy journals, and the results are now in. 43 journals were surveyed on submission and acceptance rates, review process, and the percentages of papers submitted and accepted that were written by women and members of minority ethnic groups from 2011 to 2013.

You can view the results of the survey at the APA and BPA sites, and you can write to the APA’s publication coordinator, Erin Shepherd ([email protected]) to suggest additional journals for inclusion in future versions of the survey. (via Joe Morrison on PHILOS-L)

Also, don’t forget Andrew Cullison’s Journal Surveys site.

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Dani
Dani
6 years ago

Just looking at the first journal on the list – AJOB – surely it cannot be correct that it went from an approximately 6% acceptance rate in 2011 and 2012, to a nearly 30% acceptance rate in 2013?Report

Neil
Neil
6 years ago

Interesting that some lower (though still high) prestige journals have lower acceptance rates than higher prestige journals. For instance Phil Quarterly rejects a higher proportion of submissions than Nous . Perhaps this is due to self-selection: people submit only their best papers to the higher prestige journals. This hypothesis might be supported by the sheer numbers: PQ gets far more submissions than Nous .Report

Michael Cholbi
6 years ago

Neil – I think the best explanation for the data you mention is that authors are not motivated solely by prestige in deciding which journals to submit to. In PQ’s case, two thirds of all submissions receive at least one referee report. For Nous and PPR, it’s one quarter; Phil Review 15%; Ethics 20%; etc. Authors seem to be on the hunt for journals that will give them feedback.Report

Neil
Neil
6 years ago

That’s a possible explanation, Michael. It depends on authors knowing that they are more likely to get feedback from PQ than from Nous (and believing that the feedback would be useful, of course). That’s certainly not something I knew prior to the publication of this data (though the Cullison survey presents much the same picture) . Its also hard to square with the data on Ethics, which receives substantially more submissions that Nous and provides a smaller proportion with reports.Report

Anonymous Post Doc
Anonymous Post Doc
6 years ago

Mind & Language apparently received 250 submissions in 2011, 250 in 2012, and 250 again in 2013. Which can’t be right . . .Report

Just curious
Just curious
6 years ago

Does “Percentage of submissions that receive at least one referee report” mean “Percentage of submissions where *the author* receives at least one referee report” or “Percentage of submissions where *the editor* receives at least one referee report”? This ambiguity ruins this survey question. For example, while PQ is (in my humble opinion) one of the best run journals out there, I find (based on anecdotal evidence) it hard to believe that in 60% of cases authors are receiving reports. (I find it less hard to believe that in 60% of cases the editor is receiving at least a one-line report recommending rejection.)Report

Sally Haslanger
Sally Haslanger
3 years ago

Journals should be urged to do this annually, as Ethics does:
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/698763Report