Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update (corrected)


Here’s the weekly report of what’s new at some useful online philosophy resources.

We check the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR), 1000-Word Philosophy, and occasionally some other sites for updates and report them right here.

If you think there are other regularly updated sites we should add to this feature, feel free to suggest them in the comments.

[NOTE: the NDPR listings in the original version of this post were not the correct ones; that problem has been fixed. Thanks to Gary Gutting for pointing out the error.]

SEP

New:

  1. The Ethics of Manipulation, by Robert Noggle (Central Michigan).

Revised:

  1. Kant’s Critique of Metaphysics, by Michelle Grier (San Diego State).
  2. Kant and Hume on Morality, by Eric Entrican Wilson (Georgia State) and Lara Denis (Agnes Scott).
  3. Justice and Bad Luck, by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (Aarhus).
  4. Sorites Paradox, by Dominic Hyde (Queensland) and Diana Raffman (Toronto).

IEP  Ø

NDPR

  1. Jeffrey Moriarty (Bentley) reviews Wealth, Commerce and Philosophy: Foundational Thinkers and Business Ethics (Chicago), by Eugene Heath and Byron Kaldis (eds.).

  2. Paloma Atencia-Linares (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) reviews On Photography: A Philosophical Inquiry (Routledge), by Diarmuid Costello.

  3. Jonathan Simon (New York) reviews Real Fourdimensionalism: An Essay in the Ontology of Persistence and Mind (Springer), by Ludwig Jaskolla.

  4. Elliot Rossiter (Douglas College) reviews John Locke: The Philosopher as Christian Virtuoso (Oxford), by Victor Nuovo.

  5. David Bronstein (Georgetown) reviews From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle (Oxford), by Mariska Leunissen

  6. Corey W. Dyck (Western), and Michael H. Walschots (St. Andrews) review The Emergence of Modern Aesthetic Theory: Religion and Morality in Enlightenment Germany and Scotland (Cambridge), by Simon Grote.

1000-Word Philosophy

  1. Leibniz’s Principle of Sufficient Reason, by Marc Bobro (Santa Barbara City College).

Wireless Philosophy

  1. Promising Against the Evidence, by Berislav Marušić (Brandeis).

Compiled by Michael Glawson (University of South Carolina)

 

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