Online Philosophy Resources Weekly Update

Once again, here’s the weekly report of what’s new at some useful online philosophy resources.

We check the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (NDPR), 1000-Word Philosophy, and occasionally some other sites for updates and report them right here.

If you think there are other regularly updated sites we should add to this feature, feel free to suggest them in the comments.




  1. Computing and Moral Responsibility, by Merel Noorman (Virginia).
  2. Personal Autonomy, by Sarah Buss (Michigan)  and Andrea Westlund (Western Michigan).
  3. Gilles Deleuze, by Daniel Smith (Purdue) and John Protevi (Louisiana State).
  4. Giacomo Zabarella, by Heikki Mikkeli (Helsinki).
  5. Japanese Confucian Philosophy, by John Tucker (East Carolina).
  6. Louis Althusser, by William Lewis (Skidmore College).
  7. Karl Leonhard Reinhold, by Dan Breazeale (Kentucky).


1000-Word Philosophy


  1. Krzysztof Ziarek (Buffalo) reviews Using Words and Things: Language and Philosophy of Technology (Routledge) by Mark Coeckelbergh.
  2. Sam Fleischacker (llinois-Chicago) reviews Kant and the Scottish Enlightenment (Routledge) by Elizabeth Robinson and Chris W. Surprenant (eds.).
  3. Daniel Z. Korman (California-Santa Barbara) reviews Ontology Without Borders (Oxford) by Jody Azzouni.
  4. Pascal Engel (Ecole des Hautes Ètudes en Sciences Sociales) reviews Donald Davidson’s Triangulation Argument, A Philosophical Inquiry (Routledge) by Robert H. Myers and Claudine Verheggen.
  5. Geoffrey Scarre (Durham) reviews Corporal Punishment: A Philosophical Assessment (Routledge) by Patrick Lenta.
  6. Caroline T. Arruda (Texas-El Paso) reviews Communities of Respect: Grounding Responsibility, Authority, and Dignity (Oxford) by Bennett W. Helm.
  7. Daniel Stoljar (Australian National) reviews Consciousness and Fundamental Reality (Oxford) by Philip Goff.

Compiled by Michael Glawson (University of South Carolina)


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